Posts tagged writing.

247. Hemingway by tom gauld on Flickr.

A word is not the same with one writer as with another. One tears it from his guts. The other pulls it out of his overcoat pocket.

Charles Péguy (via wwnorton)

(via proustitute)

We often notice that a writing subject does not have his writing ‘in his own image’: if you love me ‘for myself,’ you do not love me for my writing (and I suffer from it).

Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, trans. Richard Howard (via proustitute)

Oh what a grind it is embodying all these ideas and having perpetually to expose my mind, opened and intensified as it is by the heat of creation, to the blasts of the outer world. If I didn’t feel so much, how easy it would be to go on.

Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated 18 March 1935 (via proustitute)

The first obligation of the writer is to be interesting. To be interesting; not to change the world.

John Barth (via The Paris Review)

Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky. We fell them down and turn them into paper that we may record our emptiness.

Khalil Gibran, Sand and Foam (via itgivesitthewjakeisg)

(via proustitute)

I saw myself, heard myself, felt myself, not write — and yet even then knew perfectly both that I should be writing now and that I should now be sorrier than ever for my not writing then.

Henry James, from a letter to Charles Eliot Norton, 26 December 1898 (via proustitute)

A writer is a foreign country.

Marguerite Duras, Practicalities, trans. William Collins (via proustitute)

downlo:

The 30 Harshest Author-on-Author Insults In History

A sampling:

13. Gore Vidal on Truman Capote

“He’s a full-fledged housewife from Kansas with all the prejudices.”

9. Truman Capote on Jack Kerouac

“That’s not writing, that’s typing.”

15. William Faulkner on Ernest Hemingway

“He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”

14. Ernest Hemingway on William Faulkner

“Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words?”

11. Vladimir Nabokov on Ernest Hemingway (1972)

“As to Hemingway, I read him for the first time in the early ‘forties, something about bells, balls and bulls, and loathed it.”

2. William Faulkner on Mark Twain (1922)

“A hack writer who would not have been considered fourth rate in Europe, who tricked out a few of the old proven sure fire literary skeletons with sufficient local color to intrigue the superficial and the lazy.”

4. Mark Twain on Jane Austen (1898)

“I haven’t any right to criticize books, and I don’t do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticize Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can’t conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Every time I read ‘Pride and Prejudice,’ I want to dig her up and hit her over the skull with her own shin-bone.”

I Never Loved You More by Bertolt Brecht

I never loved you more, ma soeur
Than as I walked away from you that evening.
The forest swallowed me, the blue  forest, ma soeur
The blue forest and above it pale stars in the west.

I did not laugh, not one little bit, ma soeur
As I playfully walked towards a dark fate –
While the faces behind me
Slowly paled in the evening of the blue forest.

Everything was grand that one night, ma soeur
Never thereafter and never before –
I admit it: I was left with nothing but the big birds
And their hungry cries in the dark evening sky.